Tracy Marchini

Freelance editor, children's writer and occasional word inventor.

Pub Speak: A Writer’s Dictionary of Publishing Terms

Curious what a certain term means in a book contract? Not sure what the difference is between an easy reader and a picture book? Can’t tell a Newbery from a Nebula?

Pub Speak: A Writer’s Dictionary of Publishing Terms is a dictionary for both new and established authors that contains over 400 definitions, including:

- contract and royalty terms
- ebooks and audiobooks
- fiction and non-fiction
- publishing terms
- retailers, book clubs, wholesalers and distributors
- social networking and collaborative publishing
- trade associations, events and publications
- writer’s organizations, awards and publications

Writers can read the dictionary all the way through to gain a more thorough understanding of the industry, or use the dictionary to look up terms as needed. The book is not designed to replace an agent or editor, but to help authors become informed partners in the business of publishing.

Pub Speak is available in paperback or ebook at Amazon US (UK/DE/FR/ES/IT), Barnes and Noble, iTunes, Kobo, Smashwords and the Sony eReader Store.

Praise for PUB SPEAK:

“Even for those writers, editors, and publishing professionals that have been in the biz for years, understanding all of the jargon of the industry can be a bit of a challenge. For those professionals who are just starting their careers, following a conversation or email pertaining to a publishing deal, editing contract, or even the materials required to put together a book proposal can seem like trying to decipher a foreign language. I have spent a year in the industry and still constantly ask my boss what things mean. Truth be told, it’s a slow learning process, but with the help of Tracy Marchini’s new reference book you can speed the process up a bit.

Pub Speak: A Writer’s Dictionary of Publishing Terms is a veritable catalogue of acronyms, technical words, and even common awards and associations that every writer, editor, publisher, and publicist of the English language should know.”

—Ashley at Trees and Ink

“Pub Speak aims to help authors keep up to date on publishing terms and keep you from getting overwhelmed!

I highly recommend you add Pub Speak to your writing resources!”

Sydney Health Writer

“Pub Speak is the perfect handbook for those who need to navigate the publishing business. Whether you are a new author or just someone who wants to understand publishing, this dictionary is a great source for terms used in the industry.”

Bookvisions

Cover design by Michelle Davidson Argyle. Press release available here.

3 comments on “Pub Speak: A Writer’s Dictionary of Publishing Terms

  1. Pingback: Q&A with Tracy Marchini on Her Book, ‘Pub Speak’

  2. karleenbradford
    May 26, 2011

    Hi, Tracy,

    I read your guest blog on Nathan Bransford’s blog. Particularly interesting to me because I am one of the traditional authors who is leaping over, or crawling under–not quite sure which yet–the fence. I am bringing out three of my early op books as eBooks this summer. To that end, one of the ways I’m trying to promote them is through a blog. I’m intrigued by your “blog tour”. Can you tell me a bit about how this works, and what it is?

  3. Tracy Marchini
    May 31, 2011

    Hi Karleen,

    Leap sounds far better, I’d go for that one! :) To plan the blog tour, I emailed individuals whose blogs looked like a good fit for my book, and asked if they would be interested in a guest post. I tried to schedule one new post a day for a set number of days, and kept the running list here on my blog. I’ll be doing another blog tour for my short story EFFIE AT THE WEDDING in July, and it will have a similar concept. I have seen some blog tours have the link to the next day’s post within the guest post, but because I couldn’t schedule everything that far in advance, I didn’t set mine up the PUB SPEAK tour that way.

    Good luck, and click through the Pub Speak blog tour list to get an idea of the kinds of posts I did. Also, if you’re writing fiction, you can have fun by letting your characters do the guest blog, etc.

    Hope that helps!

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